Steamboat 700 Project Manager Danny Mulcahy talks with Steamboat resident Lynne Grimsley during an open house at Centennial Hall on Tuesday evening. The open house was designed to invite the public to see the proposed plans for the development west of Steamboat Springs and to address any concerns.

Photo by John F. Russell

Steamboat 700 Project Manager Danny Mulcahy talks with Steamboat resident Lynne Grimsley during an open house at Centennial Hall on Tuesday evening. The open house was designed to invite the public to see the proposed plans for the development west of Steamboat Springs and to address any concerns.

Open house rolls out experts

Steamboat 700 holds event for public to view proposals

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The city of Steamboat Springs is updating information on the proposed Steamboat 700 annexation at www.yampavalley.i...

— Steamboat 700 should someday have a city park that is as compelling as venerable Howelsen Hill in the heart of Old Town Steamboat Springs, Chris Wilson said Tuesday night.

Steamboat 700 represents a new development proposal that would add 700 acres and 2,000 homes to the city during a span of 10 to 20 years. During an open house at Centennial Hall on Tuesday, community leaders and development experts probed some of the important details in the tentative plan.

Wilson is the city's director of parks, open spaces and recreational services. He said a landmark park would help reinforce both the identity of the new community as well as ensure that it is seamlessly absorbed into the larger city.

Don't expect a ski area at the future Steamboat 700 site, Wilson said. However, he said a park in the development should be capable of hosting events like fairs and markets that would lend an identity to the neighborhood.

Wilson added that the Parks and Recreation Commission would take the new master planned development into account in its own master plan.

"We need to make sure, throughout this whole process, that it becomes as forward thinking and as special as Steamboat is now," Wilson said.

Steamboat 700 has just entered the city planning process with many public hearings to follow.

"The area is going to grow. It needs to be done in a thoughtful way," Bud Romberg said. "This is probably the most appropriate area" to absorb that growth.

Romberg is a former city planning commissioner and city councilman.

Bill Fox of Fox Higgins Transportation Group said U.S. Highway 40 west of downtown Steamboat is overdue for improvements, and the Steamboat 700 development could provide the impetus for such work.

In addition to oft-discussed plans to widen the two-lane highway west of 13th Street to four lanes, Fox suggests widening the single block of Lincoln Avenue from 12th to 13th streets to six lanes. That is the one block along Highway 40 that doesn't afford the opportunity for some redundancy via a parallel street. Throughout downtown, Oak and Yampa streets offer an alternative for motorists, Fox pointed out.

"That's the beauty of any grid of streets," he said. "You have some parallel capacity.

Further west, Fox supports the notion of a traffic roundabout to replace the confusing intersection of U.S. 40 and Routt County Road 129 (Elk River Road). The current configuration of that intersection results in disjointed turning movements that slow traffic, he said.

- To reach Tom Ross, call 871-4205

or e-mail tross@steamboatpilot.com

Comments

skisteamboat 6 years, 9 months ago

skiday11, i am with you. a roundabout? who the heck do these developers think we are? vail? aspen? what makes steamboat so special is the fact that we have retained our true identity over the years. dont start chipping away at that with some stupid roundabout.

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Ilike2dv8 6 years, 9 months ago

"what makes Steamboat so special is the fact that we have retained our true identitiy over the years." Let me get this right, not having a roundabout is part of SS's identity. Please... roundabouts are hugely more efficient and have been around for hundreds of years in europe and other parts of the world. Vail and Aspen began facing similar traffic problems to Steamboat's and so they decided to build one roundabout each to try them out. After less than a year they began planning for more and since that time have added several in each community. The didn't add them to be cool or hip but becaused they WORKED. If you contact either of their public works departments they will confirm roundabouts have been the single best solution to a large number of their traffic issues. Steamboat has a great legacy and is an wonderful town, being bogged down in traffic does not make special or unique, just foolish to not address it.

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