Lowell Whiteman Primary School students Noah Bass and Max Sauerbrey perform a scene from "Character Matters" on Wednesday. Bass, who played Jack, and Sauerbrey, who played the Giant, perform a scene inspired by the "Jack and the Beanstalk" fairy tale to emphasize that first impressions are not always correct.

Photo by Mike McCollum

Lowell Whiteman Primary School students Noah Bass and Max Sauerbrey perform a scene from "Character Matters" on Wednesday. Bass, who played Jack, and Sauerbrey, who played the Giant, perform a scene inspired by the "Jack and the Beanstalk" fairy tale to emphasize that first impressions are not always correct.

Students put own spin on classic fairy tales

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— In the classic fairy tale "Goldilocks and the Three Bears," the heroine is scared from the bears' home after being caught sleeping in the baby's bed.

In some versions of the story, Goldilocks never wakes from her slumber, but things worked out much better for the golden-haired Lowell Whiteman Primary School student on Wednesday during the school's performance of "Character Matters." In the school's version, the bears extended a hand of forgiveness to Goldilocks.

"I'd rather forgive her and change all the locks - we've got to forgive Goldilocks," said one of the bears, emphasizing a lesson to forgive and forget.

Kate McFee, the play's director and the school's upper primary English teacher, said the students have been rewriting classic fairy tales from the perspective of other characters to learn some life lessons.

"Children often find it not natural to see another point of view," she said. "So we've asked them look at some of these stories another way, to see all sides. Like in the 'Three Little Pigs,' most of them have the pig going after the wolf."

In addition to "Goldilocks and the Three Bears," the second-, third-, and fourth-graders borrowed from other classic fairy tales, such as "Little Red Riding Hood," "Cinderella," "Humpty Dumpty," and "Jack and the Beanstalk."

Each scene was addressed to a Fairy Tale Council that heard grievances from those often wronged in the stories.

"You have to always consider a person's feelings," advised the council's valiant Prince Charming.

"And don't tell anyone they have a big nose. I don't think Pinocchio will ever talk to me again," he said.

In the "Little Red Riding Hood" lesson, the Golden Rule, the hooded heroine and her grandmother took the offensive and told the wolf to do unto others as he would have them due unto him.

"Stop, Mr. Woflie. Think before you act - don't make Grandma your snack," sang the chorus.

In "Cinderella," the heroine is angry that her stepmother and stepsisters get to "eat dinner - quite delicious - I only get to lick the dishes."

The chorus advised a little stress management.

"If you are angry, count to 10, walk away, take a breath - and you're OK," they said.

After each scene, the students sang a refrain that encompassed the entirety of Wednesday's lessons.

"Character matters because of what you choose," sang the students. "Character matters because it's the only thing you can lose."

Comments

paststudent 7 years, 1 month ago

This is community news. The paper has always made it known that it is a priority. They will address world events, but they have already said they do not want to repeat what is in the large print papers. Yeah, if you want something else, get the DP, RMP, or NY Times. Be proud that our community is encouraging the work of children and educators.

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id04sp 7 years, 1 month ago

Wow.

What a bunch of Hitler Youth style propaganda.

Pinnochio had a big nose because the told LIES! And you're teaching the kids that It's more important not to hurt Pinnochio's feelings than it is to call him out as a liar? Yeah, t hat fits the People's Republic of Steamboat very well.

You poor, ignorant, liberal, socialist suckers. This is why 1400 square foot houses now cost $500,000. Everyone's brains have turned to mush.

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