Local developer Jim Cook fields a question during Colorado Group Realty's Steamboat Springs Real Estate Roundup & Expo at the Steamboat Grand Resort Hotel on Thursday.

Photo by Brian Ray

Local developer Jim Cook fields a question during Colorado Group Realty's Steamboat Springs Real Estate Roundup & Expo at the Steamboat Grand Resort Hotel on Thursday.

Developers dish a little buzz

First real estate roundup draws large attendance

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— There were enough news nuggets Thursday night at the Real Estate Expo and Roundup to keep a packed house at the Steamboat Grand Resort Hotel Ballroom paying close attention to a panel of six leading developers.

First things first.

"I'm not tearing down the Yacht Club, if that's what you were worried about," Jim Cook announced. Cook is the founder of Colorado Group Realty, whose broker owners sponsored the expo. He's also a member of the team tackling three downtown redevelopment projects. And he brought news of a fourth to Thursday's event.

Cook said he and the owners of the real estate that houses the Steamboat Yacht Club restaurant, Dick and Paulette Mills, would develop a new mixed-use building along the Yampa River.

The two-story building would be built on the lawn adjacent to the restaurant in the 800 block of Yampa Street.

Joining Cook on the speakers' dais were Jeff Temple of Due West Land and Marabou ranch preservation subdivision; Brent Pearson, a vice president with Resort Ventures West, developers of Wildhorse Meadows; Gerry Engle, a founding partner with The Atira Group, developing The Edgemont and working on the redevelopment of Ski Time Square and Thunderhead Lodge; Timbers Resorts CEO David Burden, developing One Steamboat Place adjacent to the Steamboat Gondola; and Doug Beall, the new vice president of development with Steamboat Ski & Resort Corp.

Beall said Ski Corp. has recently retained an integrated planner to help guide future development on trails, lifts and lodges on the ski mountain.

"We need to ask, 'How can we plan to make sure the mountain and the base continue to work well together?'" Beall said.

Asked by moderator Adonna Allen, president of Alpine Bank in Steamboat, whether it's inevitable that Steamboat will become Aspen, Pearson endorsed the Vision 2030 project.

"The important point for people living here is to define exactly what Steamboat is to them and to continue to communicate that. They can ask development entities to abide by those qualities."

Vision 2030, he said, is an opportunity to do just that.

Temple, whose family has lived in the valley for generations, said community institutions such as the Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club and family ranching embody the spirit of the community.

"I'm biased because I have a 7- and a 10-year-old, and our best baby sitter in the world is Howelsen Hill," Temple said.

He announced that Paul Franklin, the developer of The Olympian project at Fifth and Yampa streets, has joined Marabou in committing to initiating a transfer fee (amount to be determined) at their developments, with the proceeds going toward the endowment for the Winter Sports Club.

"It will create a continuum of support for the community and the kids," Temple said.

Cook reminded the audience he has established a similar transfer fee at his developments in memory of his late wife. The proceeds will be devoted to furthering arts and culture in the downtown.

"We're at the embryo stage, but the good news is everybody can be a part of this," he said

Other remarks by developers:

- Engle said the need for affordable housing will not go away, but solutions should be a "mosaic of solutions" done through public/private partnerships. He said one solution undertaken in the Vail Valley was meant to provide middle- income housing for firemen, teachers and nurses (for example), and allow the deed restricted housing to appreciate. The answer was to create a subdivision where buyers who exceeded income thresholds were required to pay a premium into a land bank to help create offsetting affordable housing elsewhere.

- Burden promised One Steamboat Place would become a vital destination for vacationers and locals. He said the Timbers Club in Snowmass has an 84 percent occupancy rate, but he's taking steps to ensure One Steamboat Place is livelier, with a public restaurant, already named The Truffle Pig (a name he purchased from Wildhorse Marketplace developer Whitney Ward). The development also will offer a destination spa.

- Pearson said Wildhorse would break ground on 96 attainable housing units next summer and the project has been named "First Tracks." He added that shortly after Thanksgiving, prospective buyers of deed-restricted housing would be able to submit their names and information.

"People have a chance to get in the queue for affordable housing right at the base of the mountain," he said.

- Cook announced that Ski Corp. will become a major tenant of Howelsen Place with a "concierge ski program," where lift tickets and logo apparel will be sold. He added that longtime Steamboat retailer Joe Kboudi will move All that Jazz into the Alpenglow.

- Cook also said that the development team for Riverwalk is close to signing with an architect to design a high-end hotel for the east end of that project on Yampa Street. Talks are under way with three or four operators, he added.

Comments

another_local 7 years ago

Bugman, I agree it was a good event and it was dissapointing not to see public officials present. Attendance according to the organizers was closer to 500 though. There were 300 seats (all filled) and a good sized crowd standing.

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Brent Boyer 7 years ago

bugman: I'm always open to hearing your ideas for how the paper can be a "partner in helping to build positive partnerships for the future." Please feel free to contact me.

Brent Boyer Editor, Steamboat Pilot & Today (970) 871-4221 bboyer@steamboatpilot.com

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snowysteamboat 7 years ago

RanchHQ-

They are not 35's, thus no ag exemption. Check in with your local assessor.

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bugman 7 years ago

What a great expo!! and it is too bad that the paper did not state that there were well over 1000 people there. It is sad that the paper did not pick up on the important discussion about good developers verses bad developers and how important it is to not have an advesarial enviornment so that we work with and communicate with good developers together towards our future. Advisarial enviornments attract poor developers who build and leave. It is also too bad that the paper did not talk about the important comments about our transit system. It is a wonderful one and now is the time for public/private support of this system to better it and to obtain enough drivers to allow even the exisiting routes to continue. Congratulations to Colorado Group Realty for putting this important event together. Here is hoping that next year we will see more County and City officials atttending. As a long time local who is greatly impacted by all of this growth, last night was a refreshing education. Next question, how do we get the paper to be a partner in helping to build postive partnerships for the fuuture ?

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elk2 7 years ago

Jeff Temple is a joke. he talks about how family ranching and the winter sports club embodies the spirit of the community. If you are a real ranch kid you are at home working you butt off trying to hold on to the family ranch so greedy Jeff Temple doesn't try to squeeze you out by buying up the neighboring "family ranches" to develope into Park Ave.Hollywood movie set, quasi western ranchettes. As for the Winter Sports Club, great organization but not everyone has a nanny to drop the kids off for practice. Jeff, stop trying to act like you are a Farmer/Rancher. Why don't you put your money where your mouth is and do something for the real "ranch families" of Routt Co.

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spukomy 7 years ago

Steamboat: home of debris, land of the cranes.

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Stephen Blinkenberg 7 years ago

"Marabou ranch preservation subdivision". Interesting term, never heard that one before.

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snowysteamboat 7 years ago

That term is inaccurate.

Marabou Ranch http://www.marabouranch.com/ is a land preservation subdivision. A land preservation subdivision is a county process that allows lots less than 35 acres to be exempt from the subdivision process in exchange for open space.

http://www.co.routt.co.us/planning/plans/Section%205.pdf

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Matthew Stoddard 7 years ago

Snowy- simplify it: multi-million dollar ranchettes. LOL!

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snowysteamboat 7 years ago

I m not so sure a 5 acre parcel is a ranchette but as for the price, it is truly obscene.

Kudos to them for the environmental awards though.

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Stephen Blinkenberg 7 years ago

The 35 acres makes them available for the Ag Exemptions from the Tax Man. Same at Storm Mt. Ranch, all those Ranchettes hold Ag Tax Exemptions, as long as one cow craps on each parcel, once a year, they are all Ranchettes.

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elk2 7 years ago

Snowy: I believe They still have ag status. Brent Romick has been doing these developements for years.

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OneFly 7 years ago

Burden promised One Steamboat Place would become a vital destination for vacationers and locals.

Pearson said Wildhorse would break ground on 96 attainable housing units next summer

high-end hotel

three downtown redevelopment projects

news of a fourth

One Steamboat Place would become a vital destination for vacationers and locals.

destination spa

What's the cost of the attainable units? The barn like structure south of Haymaker is not what it appears but is a art and party barn with a 1mil price tag I was told with the living structure's price tag possibly approaching 10 mil. I have a hard time using the term house because when the cost is that great it is something other than just a house. Is the new gated entrance at Stone Bridge on Steamboat Blvd. the first in town? This is and will be Aspen north.

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weststmbtres 7 years ago

I don't understand the animosity toward the LPS developers.

If a developer has 1400 acres, There are basically two scenarios for developing the land in Routt County. That is if you thow out the possibility of high density residential which simply doesn't fit the bill in the areas where they are doing LPS development.

The first scenario is the quick, easy and cheap way. Survey the property and divide it into 40 35-acre ranchettes, sell off the lots and let the owners do whater they want with each of their lots. The developer gets in and out of the property within a year or two with minimal public or local government input or oversight. The BOCC doesn't have to approve a plat or give thier input or approval on the project.

Next is the LPS in which the developer does his homework and goes through the LPS and conservation easement process. and has to get the project approved by the BOCC. The developer sells 40 10-acre homesites within the property and preserves 1000 acres for ranching, recreation, fishing, etc. The working ranch preserves the ranching lifestyle for several Steamboat locals who run it. The ranch provides income from beef and hay production and animal boarding. The ranch parcel being under a conservation easement can never be used for future development.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not promoting LPS development over historical use. It would be better if a local ranching family could retain the property in it's entirety but sometimes that's not financially feasable.

If a family can no longer afford to keep their ranch running in this economy and they have to sell, I'd much rather see a developer go through the time and effort to create an LPS.

I would also like to know from those of you who are throwing out the negative comments toward the LPS developers, how you think they could have done something differently? Give a little "constructive criticism" instead of just criticising them. I really would like to know what would you prefer to have seen done with these properties that could have made them better?

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Vince arroyo 7 years ago

attainable/ sustainable whats the answer? My thoughts are- getting rid of greed! Whom will do that to in order to obtain the piece of the boat. Now that many are here and have it and seem to want to close the gate, We all know what the answer is. Instantaneous response is what people want these days.

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elk2 7 years ago

Constructive wish list: Since the LPS guys have VERY deep pockets, How about for every ranch they develope they have to preserve one with Nature Conservancy or better yet YAMPA VALLEY LAND TRUST. Seems fair to me.

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agentofchange 7 years ago

I always like to say to folks who "just don't get" around here... "ya know this was all Ocean before it was Mountains, and you really need to get with the program"!! Clarence Wheeler truly loved that saying of mine. Bless him!

But really guys, the "class envy" that shows up in Routt County these days is very sad. That's all, just sad.

Lead, follow, or get out of the way. Your turn.

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elk2 7 years ago

Wow, You knew The Clarence Wheeler.I'm impressed!!!

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elk2 7 years ago

How do you know my financial status. I'm not talking just $$$ I'm talking about giving a damn about this valley and leaving some land for the next generation.

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jeep 7 years ago

elk2 I'm with you they just want all of the land , $$$$$ that's all they care about.

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elk2 7 years ago

pt:Thank You for the condesension. You don't know me or my life experiences. However,that wasn't the topic.

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weststmbtres 7 years ago

elk,

I think you missed the point. They don't have to preserve anything at all if they don't want to. They could divide up the land and sell every last bit of it with nothing preserved if they desired.

The fact that they are putting forth the time and effort to make an LPS speaks volumes. These ranches could just have easily been sold to a developer with less scruples, and there would be nothing preserved.

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elk2 7 years ago

:) do the math, they couldn't have gotten as many accessible 35 acre lots on marabou. So they called it a preserve chopped it into smaller pieces.

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elk2 7 years ago

pt22: This seems to be very personal to you.

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annonymous 7 years ago

agentofchange's comments peaked my curiosity so I scanned through all of his 87 postings. In one of his postings he mentioned his name and a search in the Routt County Assessor's page indicates that Agent owns no property, nothing in Steamboat or Routt County. Agent, what is up with your perspective about Steamboat and the current leadership in the City? You appear to be "carpet bagger like" in that you have no real vested interest in Steamboat but merely in what you can gain personally. If you really care about Steamboat's future, I say put your money where your mouth is.

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elk2 7 years ago

Just for grins I took a drive the other night on 44. Every light in every "cabin" was lit at Marabou. It looked like the Las Vegas strip at night.

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weststmbtres 7 years ago

That sounds better than Vail, Aspen and Summit County where I've also spent a lot of time. In those towns most nights the majority of the second homes sit dark and empty.

Again, you've missed the point. They made more homesites but still preserved over 1,000 acres for a working ranch. They didn't have to preserve anything if they didn't want to.

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elk2 7 years ago

West: I know a wolf in sheeps clothing when I see one.

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agentofchange 7 years ago

annonymous, you know how to contact me personally. Do so, and we can continue with the "private" chat. I have been here a long time, and I contibute to this Valley, as a proud resident and business owner. My comments and opinions are no less valid than yours or anyone who posts here. If I'm a "carpet bagger" in your opinion, so be it. Stand up and contact me. You know who I am? I think not, but get to know me, if you wish, I believe you will change your mind. I have nothing to hide.

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