Participants at The Economic Restructuring Committee of Mainstreet Steamboat Springs' half-day window dressing workshop are reflected in a storefront window on Lincoln Avenue as they discuss design concepts Thursday.

Photo by Brian Ray

Participants at The Economic Restructuring Committee of Mainstreet Steamboat Springs' half-day window dressing workshop are reflected in a storefront window on Lincoln Avenue as they discuss design concepts Thursday.

Patagonia merchandiser critiques local window displays

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— Windows are more than just somewhere to look.

They also are valuable tools for businesses seeking to highlight merchandise and draw potential customers inside, said Terri Brady, regional visual merchandiser for Patagonia sportswear. Brady led a window-dressing workshop Thursday for dozens of local businesspeople, in an event sponsored by Main Street Steamboat Springs.

Strolling along Lincoln Avenue in downtown Steamboat, Brady assessed which downtown displays were great marketing tools and which still needed help to draw customer interest as businesses prepare for the upcoming holiday shopping season.

Attendees got a crash course in merchandising theory and concepts such as texture and color, said Tracy Barnett, Main Street's executive director.

In designing commercial window displays, Brady emphasized strategies such as grouping similar products, focusing merchandise at eye level and considering the effects of different types of lighting.

She praised F.M. Light and Sons' front for its cohesive western theme and for how frequently the display is refreshed.

"All the materials used really speak to that whole rustic theme that's being brought up," Brady said.

The window displays at Moose Mountain Trading Co. also garnered high marks from Brady, who praised their integration of holiday decor and storytelling.

Owner Jennifer Wilson said her store's window displays aim to be appealing and interesting, but also to have a sense of humor.

"We put a lot of energy into the windows," Wilson said. "We really do try to tell a story with all the merchandise."

Wilson said the workshop was especially helpful for her newer employees, who have less experience in merchandising and were just "tickled to have the opportunity to learn."

Comments

id04sp 6 years, 5 months ago

Well for ONE thing, the folks at the Cantina should get rid of that sign. It's all backwardy and stuff.

And maybe the Pilot could use a photographer and a spirit level to get some idea of what Lincoln avenue would look like if it was not on a steep hill.

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rogue_theory 6 years, 5 months ago

^^^^ LOL!! Thanks id04sp for the first laugh of my Friday.

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id04sp 6 years, 5 months ago

Maybe Gary Wall is working as a part-time photographer for the Pilot while his case is investigated . . . ..

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CoJustice 6 years, 5 months ago

id: Since I almost shot coffee through my nose at this one, you get the guffaw award today !

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id04sp 6 years, 5 months ago

Anybody wanna bet that the Pilot gets all those big awards again next year? This one would go under "Best Photograph of a Parallel Universe."

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wzstfu 6 years, 5 months ago

Sorry Brian Ray, but if you were attempting something artsy you failed miserably. How is it that the Pilot keeps winning these awards?

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80488mom 6 years, 5 months ago

They are competing with newspapers of similar circulation.....small town newspapers.

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80488mom 6 years, 5 months ago

.....however, in photography John Russell has won numerous awards and all well deserved. He's a very seasoned and talented photographer and I'm sure would win even competing against big city photojournalists. He's taken some breathtaking photos of scenery around here and some incredible sports action shots. I've picked up the paper many a morning and seen a picture that was just captivating and without fail it's John's byline.

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