Author Tim Sandlin will be signing copies of his book, "Jimi Hendrix Turns Eighty," at Off the Beaten Path Bookstore on Tuesday at 5:30 p.m.

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Author Tim Sandlin will be signing copies of his book, "Jimi Hendrix Turns Eighty," at Off the Beaten Path Bookstore on Tuesday at 5:30 p.m.

It's hip to be old

Author to sign copies of 'Jimi Hendrix Turns Eighty'

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— Tim Sandlin said his book, "Jimi Hendrix Turns Eighty," is a future autobiographical fantasy.

"It's about what I am going to be like in about 20 years," he said. "Or what I hope I'm like in 20 years."

Sandlin will sign copies of the book Tuesday at Off the Beaten Path Bookstore. He will be available at 5:30 p.m.

His novel shows what happens when hippies take over a San Francisco-area assisted living facility in 2023.

"They take over the institution and half of them still think it's 1970, and Nixon is still on the other side of the wall," he said.

Sandlin, who has now published eight books, always wanted to write about hippies, but in a way that wasn't a cliche or goofy.

"But it was cliche and goofy. You have to have that stuff in there or it wouldn't be the truth," he said. "It's more like the movie 'The Alamo' than 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest,' and it's acted out by the grumpy old stoners."

Eighty is the new 18, Sandlin said, because the elderly have the chance to be children again.

"You have the convenience of being crazy and you can get rid of the filters," he said. "We've all been responsible for 50 to 60 years and will want to go back to childhood."

Sandlin spent the past 25 years of his life living in Jackson Hole, where he wrote during the day and worked at night.

"I had about 40 entry-level jobs here in Jackson Hole," he said. "I would get a bad job on purpose for the fear that I would stop writing if I got anything good."

Most of his novel was written in the nursing home where his father began living after he was diagnosed with dementia.

Although the book is comical, there is an important message about the treatment of the elderly.

"Be nice to old people because someday - if you are lucky - you'll be one," Sandlin said. "It's amazing how prejudice people can be to a minority that they someday will become."

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