"Mountain Aspen," oil painting by Richard Galusha. Galusha will have 35 new paintings at the Wild Horse Gallery of Steamboat Springs. The opening reception is tonight from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Gallery in the Sheraton Steamboat Resort.

Courtesy photo

"Mountain Aspen," oil painting by Richard Galusha. Galusha will have 35 new paintings at the Wild Horse Gallery of Steamboat Springs. The opening reception is tonight from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Gallery in the Sheraton Steamboat Resort.

New works, veteran artists

Gary Price and Richard Galusha perpetuate their art forms

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Past Event

Opening reception for new works by Richard Galusha and Gary Price

  • Friday, February 2, 2007, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Wild Horse Gallery, 2200 Village Inn Court, Steamboat Springs
  • All ages / Free

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Gary Price's heaviest bronze sculpture weighs between 5 and 6 tons.

"It is at the Nu Skin headquarters in Provo, Utah," Price said. "It is a world sphere with children flying around it and sits on top of their fountain logo. It had a lot of stainless steel engineered into the piece to make it structurally sound."

Price will present more heavy pieces and new work at the Wild Horse Gallery of Steamboat Springs during an opening reception tonight that also will feature new oil paintings by Richard Galusha.

One of the sculptures Price shipped here from his own foundry in Springville, Utah, took nine men and a forklift to get into the moving van.

"It is a life-size Shakespeare sitting on a bench that weighs 900 pounds," he said. "I do a lot of life-size pieces, but the mid-size pieces are more like 45 to 65 pounds and are pretty maneuverable."

Price's five sons have served as models for many of his sculptures. His recent project involves a series of sculptures depicting children.

"I have a real affinity to children and books and learning because my wife and I did the home-schooling thing for quite a few years," Price said. "The core foundation of the program was reading, and out of that came a bunch of sculptures of children sitting on stacks of books."

Making sculptures of birds equally fascinates Price.

"After doing a bunch of them, I got into the concept of flight itself and the symbology of how man has always tried to fly," he said. "It's a very cathartic and therapeutic thing to get off the earth and take a flight somewhere, and to be able to remove myself from all the stuff we get encumbered with on our planet."

One of Price's sculptures is of his son riding on a paper airplane. Now, his son is a pilot who takes his father on flights.

"It's really fun how the whole thing has manifested throughout the years," Price said. "My goal with sculpting is to lift the human spirit. I like for people who come in contact with my work to fuel their inspiration."

Since Richard Galusha's retirement from teaching about a year ago, he has found time to exercise his own inspiration. He has completed 35 new oil landscape paintings.

"Primarily because I had been teaching, I've never been able to gather up this much work," Galusha said. "It's great to have time to paint and not have to do it on the weekend or in the morning before I went to go teach."

Galusha is on a lifelong journey to become a good landscape painter.

"In this particular show, the paintings are cleaner and have an emotional impact as far as the quality goes," he said. "I try to make them personal so people can look at them and say, 'That's a Rich Galusha painting.'"

After honing his craft for 20 years, he has developed a unique style but continues to strive to improve the quality of his work.

"I look at the old painters in history and hope to one day create a painting as great as the ones they paint. The only way to do that is to continually study and practice and keep trying to push the envelope on quality," Galusha said. "It takes a lifetime to achieve it, and I'm only 52. If I live to be 100, I'm halfway there."

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