Council sets priorities

Members have differing philosophies on affordable housing

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— Councilman Steve Ivancie entered Saturday's all-day City Council retreat concerned about his fellow council members' commitment to affordable housing.

Ivancie may have been comforted by the council's unanimous vote that affordable housing will be one of its top priorities, but he also heard clearly different philosophies on how to approach the issue.

Ivancie, a supporter of the previous City Council's work in the affordable housing arena, was the sole opposing vote recently on a motion to remove $80,000 for an affordable housing feasibility study on a piece of city-owned property known as the Bear River Parcel. Councilwoman Meg Bentley, one of five new members to join City Council last month, was absent for the 5-1 vote.

In addressing Ivancie's concerns, Councilman Walter Magill summed up the majority opinion when he said, "Housing is a priority. Housing at the Bear River is not a priority."

Councilwoman Cari Hermacinski, who initiated the motion to remove the study's funding, said she did so because it is not a time-sensitive issue and because she has questions about the proposal. She also was concerned because the Bear River Parcel is zoned for open space. Hermacinski said she does not want to create affordable housing at the expense of open space, which she said is another high community priority.

According to city staff reports, only five or six of the Bear River Parcel's 18.5 acres would be used for deed-restricted, for-sale housing. During Saturday's council retreat, Ivancie disagreed that the issue is not time-sensitive.

"Some people might not think it's time-sensitive, but I think it is because we are going to need housing," he said.

Ivancie also challenged notions that giving the money to the Yampa Valley Housing Authority would be a better option.

"I don't think the Housing Authority is in a position to do something like this," Ivancie said.

"Because we've starved them," Councilman Scott Myller shot back.

Myller and others expressed the opinion that the city was too often duplicating or undermining the efforts of the Housing Authority, when it should be empowering it. Myller also spoke out against the city's plan to hire its own affordable housing coordinator.

"I don't think I'd hire an affordable housing coordinator," Myller said.

City Manager Alan Lanning said the motivation behind hiring an affordable housing coordinator is not to undermine the Housing Authority but to protect the city's individual interests. Lanning said the city already has interviewed candidates for the job.

"Regardless of whether we partner with the Housing Authority or not, I thought it was important for our organization to have a coordinator to protect our interests," Lanning said.

Lanning also encouraged council members to consider the city's interests when it comes to the recent purchase of the Iron Horse Inn to provide affordable, rental housing for city employees and others. Some new council members at Saturday's retreat continued to question the financial wisdom of the $4 million purchase.

"I don't think the Iron Horse is blowing money," Lanning said. "I think it is a wise expenditure of money that will help us well into the future."

Lanning also said many of the council members' suggestions regarding the motel - such as reallocating $1 million currently dedicated to a facility remodel - went beyond the policy considerations they should be focused on.

"Forgive me for being honest with you, but this is the poster child for how you get involved in administration versus policy," Lanning said.

Other top City Council priorities identified at Saturday's retreat were issues related to growth west of the city, including the impending annexation of a 700-acre development that could include more than 2,000 homes.

"What we're annexing is so big. I'm telling you it's a priority," City Council President Loui Antonucci said.

The council members also discussed possibly revisiting the inclusionary zoning and linkage ordinances passed by the previous City Council. While Ivancie said the ordinances should be left alone and given a chance to work, Hermacinski said there are three "little bitty" changes that she thinks could improve the legislation.

Comments

housepoor 6 years, 4 months ago

JonC, I assume your place has a deed restriction on it? If so, what are those restrictions? Do they restrict who you may sell it to or the appreciation or both? Not judging just curious.

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ColoradoNative 6 years, 4 months ago

Thanks for sharing your story Jon and keep up the good work!

I just think the free market is a better option than relying on government inference/tax dollars.

It sounds like the system worked for you. That's fine and dandy. How many people didn't qualify for your Fox Creek village condo?

What about them? So you got what YOU wanted that is all that matters right?

What others are suggesting (agentofchange) is to create some FREE market conditions and truly affordable homes ie Manufactured homes/ apartment rentals.

The government can only "help" so many people.

I've been flat broke before and NEVER have looked for the government for assistance. It's just not in my nature.

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Dave Moloney 6 years, 4 months ago

Just what we need. Another middle management position to "coordinate" the city's affordable housing issues. After all someone will have to look after the Iron Horse boondoggle. In order to insure their job security they will push for more city funded programs.. Then of course, they'll need an assistant, a company car, a bigger office, etc. This is classic big government thinking. Who do you think is going to pay for it? This type of stuff just drives up the cost of living here further. The city should let the private sector and the free market handle the affordable housing issue. The underlying issue in affordable housing is the cost of land. If you insist on spending our money, stop throwing it away on new government jobs, studies and consultants and buy some land. Use powers already vested in the government such as annexation and zoning to create a parcel suitable for dense development. A 40 acre tract zoned for small lots that a person could purchase and put a nice double wide manufactured home on might create something like 200 truly affordable units. I'm sure there is someone out there that would love to be able to develop their land this way. They just need to get the right signals from the powers that be.

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Steve Lewis 6 years, 4 months ago

Boatdweller, I think most everyone will agree we need the "40 acres with 200 manufactured homes", and we need it badly. That is the free market element that will best provide new middle class housing ownership in Steamboat. And that is just a start.

It is also only one sector of the real need. There are two income tiers below that middle class (Those from 120% to 80% Average Median Income (AMI) and those below 80% AMI). Those people are equally important to our economy. Housing within Steamboat's city limits is equally important for them as well. Those two levels have received some support via the ordinances Cari wants to change.

I admit the lower tier of need is the most difficult to mitigate, and may prove impossible, but the IZ ordinance offers mitigation for the next tier very effectively. Going backwards on the idea of integrating our workforce into our community is to say: 1) we don't mind the extra traffic of the commuters, and 2) we don't mind the economic instabilities of relying on a workforce driving from 17-40 miles away.

The Housing Authority is a good tool to support, but the bonding and other superior capacities of the City make the City the critical institution in addressing this need.

-Steve Lewis

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Gadfly 6 years, 4 months ago

I don't understand. The new City Council has said that it wants to give the Housing Authority the resources it needs to do the job for which it was created by the City and Routt County. Council has said that it doesn't want the City to have its own, separate housing officer. Isn't that the end of the discussion? How can the city manager decide to go off on his own and create an office that the City Council doesn't want? Who works for whom?

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corduroy 6 years, 4 months ago

I can't understand how the families that qualify for our "affordable housing" can afford to live here already even if they are just renting. I apparently make too much myself, but I couldn't afford to buy in town on my own either.. it just doesn't work

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beentheredonethat 6 years, 4 months ago

The city should let the private sector and the free market handle the affordable housing issue.

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zadgreb 6 years, 4 months ago

Private sector and the free market? Don't hold your breath! They will continue to do what they've always done, exploit the work force and the uber-rich's desire to buy a life style in the mountains. The City , our School district, Hospital, ect need to attract qualified people to provide the services, we all demand. At least the City was willing to "walk the talk" unlike all the self serving previous Councils! The generation gap is expanding! Stop eating your young Steamboat.

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rodcarew 6 years, 4 months ago

Boatdweller: first you say the Iron Horse is a boodoggle, then you say the city should buy some land. I see the Iron Horse as an example of buying land. The location for such housing couldn't be better due to it being on the bus line and within walking distance to downtown and the core trail. I think the Iron Horse is okay for rental housing in its existing state for the foreseeable future, but that site is underutilized and should eventually be redeveloped with a lot more density.

On your other point, the city has/is using it's powers of annexation to faciliate affordable housing. It's called Steamboat 700. Without the city's facilitation, there would be no free market affordable housing on this property, or anywhere else for that matter.

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agentofchange 6 years, 4 months ago

If Steve Ivancie had been on the recent ballot, he would have been gone too!

As I've said in prior posts, Alan Lanning needs to go.

Grab this newsflash... Not everyone should own a home. Yes, I said it. Here it is again... Not everyone should own a home! This is a large part of what happened with the sub-prime mess. The Feds allowed the "dream of home ownership" to get in the way of proper screening prior to lending monies, many times at 100%++ funding. We all will be dealing with the results of that garabge for a long time.

Government has no business being in the housing business! No one will vote for additional taxes to pay for funding for "affordable housing". That means it must come out of the Cities treasure chest, and that is doing the funding by means of "back-door policies". Tabor is being violated, and the will of the people is being mocked. If you think funding (TAXES) should be raised to pay for sombody to buy a house, put it on the ballot. Let's have a vote. It would not have a snowballs chance in hell.

When I review the way in which the "Trojan House" deal was put together, it makes me ill.

We need builder (developer) incentives to build affordable rental units. Come on new Council, do not cave. Do what you were elected to do. Ivancie, you're the odd man out. Thank you voters!

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ColoradoNative 6 years, 4 months ago

I agree agentofchange.

The majority of people needed to drive buses, work at the mountain, basic services are SEASONAL! They want to enjoy all the things the Yampa Valley has to offer and they may not necessarily want to live here year round anyway.

Affordable rental units...Affordable rental units.....Can you say that City Council?

I totally agree about letting the free market handle the affordable units for people to buy. Manufactured homes is a great idea for those that want to become owners in this market.

We need less government and tax dollars being wasted on government housing. It's very simple.

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housepoor 6 years, 4 months ago

lets not confuse the Iron Horse with affordable housing...........the Iron Horse is employee housing....any major employer in town knows it will be a necessity if they have any hopes of meeting their seasonal employment needs. I disagree with most affordable housing incentives like deed restrictions and the mobile park, but an employer securing housing so they can attainkeep staff is just good business.

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agentofchange 6 years, 4 months ago

Yes, one size does not fit all. if an employer chooses to provide "housing" as an incentive, fine. This city/county has no business in that business.

If the city/county chooses to do the same, it better be funded by that departments budget. There is a big difference between that idea and what the last Council wanted. Overturn the last Councils follies.

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Steve Lewis 6 years, 4 months ago

Jon Casson, What you bring to our community is so important to who we are. Thanks. It is also impossible to fit your contributions into a "budget" or the "pro-forma" we tend to use to measure ideas like Affordable Housing. Please stay involved with the Affordable Housing conversation, because just as we need you now, we'll need you and others like you contributing and living in our town 20 years from now. -Steve Lewis

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Jonathan Casson 6 years, 4 months ago

Affordable housing is a real issue and its not about the seasonal workers.

I've lived here for just 10 years and I care a great deal about Steamboat and the community. I've worked hard to get to where I am. I have a decent job making a decent income. I work with local youth with the SSWSC to help the kids I work with to reach their goals in athletics and in life. I volunteer my time to a variety of causes around town and spend a ton of personal time, energy and my own money to help out and contribute to the community. I honestly believe in the people in Steamboat and what we stand for. I think I contribute to the community as a whole in a positive manner, but, there is no way I could afford to buy a home or condo in Steamboat with the current economic factors. Housing cost have so far outstripped the income levels, its simply not possible for someone who makes the AVERAGE income of Steamboat to afford to buy a home. Ask any mortgage broker the income level it takes to buy a condo priced at over 300k and compare that to the MEDIAN income...the math simply doesnt work.

I was lucky enough to get an opportunity to buy a condo through the Housing Authority in Fox Creek Village at the moderate income level. The purchase of my home was one of the most satisfying things to ever happen in my life. I feel settled here and that Steamboat will be my home for many years to come. It gives me the stability to continue doing the work that I do and the knowledge that my I can continue to do the things that are important to me and to this community. I truly feel that my work makes a positive impact in this community. Its almost insulting to read the comments on this message board that claim that affordable housing is not important. People on these boards decry the loss of community, but it precisely people like me and the teachers, coaches, nurses, firefighters, police officers and other "normal" people who help make Steamboat the community it is. If people like me are forced to look elsewhere for a decent living situation, whats to keep us here?

I guarantee that most of us could live in Denver or anywhere else, make a better wage and afford to buy property, but we stay here because we love the lifestyle and the people who live here. We can make a difference and contribute. The YVHA is not funded through taxes, but through fees placed on the developers. If City Council would let the Housing Authority do what its tasked to do, it doesnt cost the taxpayers any extra money and helps people like me stay here. Is that really a bad thing?

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housepoor 6 years, 4 months ago

Can someone tell me the restrictions that are placed on deed restricted housing?

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Steve Lewis 6 years, 4 months ago

Colorado Native, Since Jon now owns a home, he obviously wouldn't be writing his comment above if he only cared for "getting what he wanted". I read his comment as a sincere effort to engage with our communitiy's future direction.

His perspective is important. We don't hear much from the "teachers, coaches, nurses, firefighters, police officers and other "normal" people who help make Steamboat the community it is", as Jon put it.

It may be that we don't hear from those critical members of our community because they'll need more courage to do so than you and I. This blog already offers to embarrass them with commments about "handouts" and "government asistance". Do they. like Jon, need to list a resume of things they are doing for our community to make us understand they are important too?

Jon and his list of peers are as much the anchor of this boat as you or I. This City would be an empty shell without them today, and will be an empty shell without them tommorrow. What you choose to call a handout, I say is an investment in our character, and an investment in our economy.

-Steve Lewis

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speakingup 6 years, 4 months ago

If the free market is so good at creating affordable housing, where is it? I moved here in the early 90's and I've only seen housing prices skyrocket. To be sure, some developers have built units that are initially in the more affordable range, but with no restrictions and speculators buying them up then reselling them, even those units are now in the half million and above range.

Agentofchange you casually state that employers should provide housing for their employees, not the city. That's fine for major employers, but what about me, the small business owner? I employ 4 people and (including myself) help provide the means for 5 middle class families to be part of our community. We all contribute to this community in a variety of ways, and I am very appreciative of my staff. But I can't afford to pay them more without putting my business in financial ruin; I would love to provide health insurance, but I can't afford it, and housing is out of the question. Over the years I've lost 3 employees because of their inability to find even marginally affordable housing (and only one of them was looking to buy!). So, lack of affordable housing, rental or for purchase, has cost my business a lot.

I applaud the city's attempt to create affordable housing, and whether or not it's the perfect solution (and there is no perfect solution), deed restriction at least provides for continued affordability. I know many have commented that the previous council was focused on a "socialist" agenda, but for me housing is an economic reality. If my workers don't have a place to live, they leave; if others can't find a place they can afford, they don't come. If the demand for workers that are here is higher than the supply and we are all fighting for the same few, turnover is high, productivity is down as well as morale.

Other communities have bent over backwards to entice and keep a valued workforce; it seems Steamboat's motto is: If you don't want to make multiple and severe sacrifices to live here - move! Steamboat, they are listening... and they are moving away!

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Jonathan Casson 6 years, 4 months ago

Thanks for the comments on my post. I appreciate the intelligent debate.

sbvor- thank you for your interest in my personal life and your insights on what I have done to myself. However, you simply have absolutely no clue what you are talking about. You presume WAY too much. Do you even know what the deed restrictions are? Do you assume that I was somehow manipulated into purchasing my home? I went into this agreement with my eyes wide open. The simple fact of the matter is that I had a choice. Without making this purchase, I probably wouldn't be here anymore. Just like many teachers, nurses, firefighters and other important components of our community who have already left due the high cost of living.

If the free market is the answer, why hasnt it happened? I have hopes for the Steamboat 700, but the past few large developments built in the area have been multi-million dollar mini ranches. Economics are determined by supply and demand. You build more homes and price goes down, simple as that, right? If this truly works, why has NO ONE done it?

Lastly- sbvor, you seem to believe so strongly in your ideals, why do you remain anonymous? Its pretty hard to take your opinions seriously when you dont even believe enough to put your real name behind your comments.

Boatdweller- you're right...20 years ago it was possible to purchase smaller properties and work your way up, but housing prices have so far outpaced wages, its nearly impossible to make that happen in the current economics of Steamboat. The math simply doesnt work anymore.

Finally, for those of you who asked- the YVHA deed restrictions divide the units into Low Income and Moderate Income. The Low Income units can be sold at 3% appreciation per year. The Moderate Income restriction is simply that the unit has to be sold to someone else in that income bracket.

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Steve Lewis 6 years, 4 months ago

Sbvor, Your solution is building so much that affordability is achieved. I'm glad to see you offering a solution.

Scott Myller suggests the same. Scott has also urged relaxing the Urban Growth Boundary (UGB). The UGB limits urban level development from going to our south, or from going up the Elk River valley. Do you also advocate relaxing the boundary?

Do you think the free market will follow your curve of diminishing returns on investment to the level of affordability? I do not. -Steve Lewis

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Steve Lewis 6 years, 4 months ago

Sbvor, Interesting that the Potemkin villages, as described in your link, actually turned out to be "fortresses, ships of the line, and thriving settlements".

Still I like it that today you venture a solution. The dogmatic trenches of older arguments serve nothing. -Steve Lewis

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Steve Lewis 6 years, 4 months ago

To all, Obviously the City of Steamboat Springs is funded by SALES TAX.

Sales taxes that are paid for mostly by visitors. I believe the average estimate is visitors pay 50-55% of our sales taxes.

Sales taxes are also known to be regressive - i.e. lower income citizens pay a higher % of their income to sales taxes than do higher income citizens. Given such, the "handout" complaint is an illusion. -Steve Lewis

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agentofchange 6 years, 4 months ago

lewi and company, handouts, entitlements, givaways, yes they are real, and not an illusion. Socialist garbage pure and simple.

You say the sales tax is driven by out of towners, what does it do to the local folks? It has more to do with money woes for those "locals" you pretend to want to help then what you know.

It's not just about the roof over your head. This is not a cheap place to live, no one said it was, and frankly, it's not for everyone.

If you want funding for housing, put it on the ballot, I dare you. It will lose because in the booth, the truth comes out.

Being a small business owner too, I understand the concerns about keeping good people due to housing, however, I believe the government should have nothing to do with this issue. Government will always make everyone pay for the few. This is wrong.

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agentofchange 6 years, 4 months ago

lewi, and don't forget about "linkage". That has nothing to do with sales tax. It was all about getting those evil developers to pitch-in. Sales tax?

Get in line everyone, get your handout.

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Dave Moloney 6 years, 4 months ago

rodcarew - Please reread my original post. I am not advocating for the government to be involved in the housing sector but rather being a realist stating that "If you insist on spending our money, stop throwing it away on new government jobs, studies and consultants and buy some land." I further stated "I'm sure there is someone out there that would love to be able to develop their land this way. They just need to get the right signals from the powers that be." In other words, let the free market handle it.

As far as the annexation of Steamboat 700 it hasn't happened yet and again I am advocating that this is the type of thing the city should be doing not wasting our money trying to override free market forces. (Assuming Steve Lewis is correct that 55% of the sales tax comes from visitors, by my calculation that means 45% is still coming from us."). Zoning a portion of the property for extremely high density might allow for a large(100+) apartment complex. Go anywhere else in this country and you will find these types of properties. I don't know of anything bigger than maybe 20-30 units anywhere in Steamboat. I'm sure there are many developers that would be willing to invest their hard earned money to build a large complex such as this that they could rent for reasonable rates and still make a fair return for the risk that they have taken.

The free market always finds a way to solve these kinds of problems if given the opportunity to do so. For example, if an employer can't find employees because they all say they can't afford to live here. The employer will start paying them more, buy some housing to rent to his employees, etc. He then passes the cost along to his consumer, thereby moving the costs to the people who benefit from it. This is as opposed to the scenario where the government tries to force their view of the solution down our throats, and we all end up paying for it, regardless of wether we receive a direct benefit.

Lastly, a little background on my perspective. I've lived in Steamboat for nearly 20 years. In the early years I struggled to make ends meet and worked multiple jobs like many people. I wanted to stay, so I did what I had to do. For me that ment living in the cheapest crappiest trailer I could afford, saving a little, buying a slightly less crappy trailer, saving a little, condo, save, townhouse, save, house. Many others I know have paid their dues and not had the benefit of a handout to get it done.

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OnTheBusGus 6 years, 4 months ago

Unfortunately some arrived too late to scrimp, save, purchase and move up, purchase and move up. My spouse and I looked into purchasing recently and aside from not quite having the $30k for a down payment, we also do not have the desire to live paycheck to paycheck as we pay out $3000+ a month for the mortgage and all the other bills. We already have three jobs between us not to mention a series of seasonal jobs that sustain us year round. We are saving for a home, but it won't be one here. Since June we have had 7 friends who moved away because they could not find an affordable place to live. Most lost their leases because of a sale or rent increase and one "cashed out" of Steamboat because he got married and had children and they weren't making it on one income. One income? Yeah, because of the cost of childcare. You know, why work and only realise 90% of your income because the rest was spent on childcare. Definitely better to stay home and spend QT with your kids! Anyway, with those 7 leaving this community lost a receptionist, bookkeeper, waitress, barista, groomer, ski instructor, ski patroller, reservationist, babysitter, mechanic and some great people. Yes, there are more than 7 jobs listed because most people have multiple jobs and/or seasonal jobs. Furthermore, some of these positions have not been filled. If my spouse and I leave, there are 6 more positions to be filled. If we are typical, then for every person to leave, there are 2-3 positions to fill including seasonal jobs. If Steamboat values it's workforce and wishes to keep quality employees, something needs to be done. Pay needs to increase to keep up with rising housing costs or some kind of affordable housing or subsidy needs to be implemented. Just think about what would happen if no one is there to make your latte, provide you with groomed corduroy to ski, take care of your family's kids when they visit so you can enjoy a night on the town, or pick your broken body up from the slopes? Sure, there might be someone but they might not speak English!

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Steve Lewis 6 years, 4 months ago

Sbvor, You don't offer any real conversation. Nor are you very friendly. Wasted time. -Steve Lewis

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ColoradoNative 6 years, 4 months ago

I think you hit the nail on the head with #4 Sbvor.

There are plenty of affordable homes for sale in Hayden, Oak Creek, yampa etc. All within 20 minutes or so of the mountain.

I think what I'm hearing is these people want affordable ski in ski out units!

What I would suggest is to anyone that doesn't own a home yet buy into those markets and ride that wave now because they aren't going to get any cheaper. Steamboat is not going to get any cheaper at it's current pace until some massive inventory comes down the pipe.

Demand>Supply. It's very simple.

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snowysteamboat 6 years, 4 months ago

Assessor incorrect.

I am not sure how they could be this far off but all of the units in Fox Creek Village, except the ADA unit, are 2bdrm, 2 bath and come in at 1,035 square feet.

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Dave Moloney 6 years, 4 months ago

sbvor - How am I WRONG. I state that I started in a crappy little trailer and worked,saved,moved up. I am one of the local wage earners that has worked his way up the housing ladder. Are you disagreeing with some other point?

Onthebusgus - I made less than $10K the first year I lived here. That was a big pay cut over what I was making at the time I took Warren Miller's advise and quit my city job and moved to ski town so I wouldn't be a year older when I finally did it. Yes, things were cheaper, but it was also much more difficult to find any kind of a decent paying job. I can't overstate that I was willing to live in a "CRAPPY" trailer for some number of years in an effort to try and move up. If it was today, and I wanted to be in a ski town bad enough, I'd drive from Oak Creek, Hayden or Craig, buy a place there, and do the same thing. It's a heck of a lot better than having a 45 minute commute from some suburb into downtown Houston, Chicago, Miami, etc.

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Steve Lewis 6 years, 4 months ago

sbvor FACTS? You don't have the conversational discipline to answer my 2 questions, you cannot refrain from frequent insults, and you subscribe very heavily to a hate of anything governmental that leaves reason behind.

Yes, you get the last word quite often. Feels like a victory? Its also possible you are simply the last one standing in your insult laden version of a reality only you understand.

-Steve Lewis

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corduroy 6 years, 4 months ago

Unforunately, I make too much to qualify with YVHA, however still not enough to actually purchase a condo (much less a house with my own lot) in Steamboat. The cheapest I've seen lately is $270,000 for maybe 600 sqft Instead of dicking around paying rent any longer (I would not be able to afford rent here anymore at this point) I chose to buy in Stagecoach, and since its the OC, I can't even vote in Steamboat anymore.. yet I still live and breathe Steamboat. It was a hard decision to make, I'm young and I get paid less than I could make someplace else, but I'm willing to make that sacrifice to be here to recreate.

Work to live not live to work! Maybe someday I'll buy something in Steamboat, but its not looking good at this rate, we'll probably buy some land in Wyoming and build a house instead.

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corduroy 6 years, 4 months ago

sbvor: OK, someone HAS to say it. As much as its fun we can all post in the forums and such, you never have anything positive to say. Do you actually live in Steamboat? Even in Colorado? You seem to hate everything Steamboat does, either start a committee for change, run for an office, or move! geez!

All your posts are links barely anyone has the desire or time to sift through, and your only purpose is to constantly try to prove everyone else is wrong and you are right.

You can't persuade everyone all the time, maybe you are used to getting your way. You complain about affordable housing so much, you obviously either are still renting, don't live here, or have your million dollar house in town so its not YOUR problem is it?

seriously, I've never been able to actually hold a conversation with you with you bombarding me with links. Everything we read on the Internet is right, isn't it... hahah

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annonymous 6 years, 4 months ago

sbvor - "What I HATE is the inappropriate, demonstrably counterproductive, and downright destructive intrusion on the part of government into the delivery of goods an services which ALL of human history PROVES is best left to Private Markets." Please tell all of us who in the private sector will plow the roads, who will provide police and fire services, who will provide parks, open space and recreational opportunities? You say that history has proven the delivery of goods and services should be left to the Private Market. Please tell us who in the private market would offer such services when these services can surely never make a profit.

The role of government is to provide those services that the private market won't. In the case of the Iron Horse, the City is providing housing for the seasonal workers necessary to keep the economy of this ski town going. YVHA purchased the Fish Creek Trailer park, with a loan from the City, to provide a stable, affordable place for many of our residents to live for the long term. Additionally, those residents have the option to purchase the land which they currently rent at a reasonable amount. Again, who else would provide this?

Others have asked about you and what motivates such hate and contempt of our community. The question was asked - Do you live in Steamboat - and so far, no answer. Steamboat Springs is not perfect and we are struggling with severe growing pains. The members of this community are trying to come up with solutions to address these important issues and all you provide is pontification and no real solutions.

Again, who are you and what motivates such negative, destructive commentary?

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Matthew Stoddard 6 years, 4 months ago

Annonymous- No, sbvor is probably out cashing that Socialist Security check.

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armchairqb 6 years, 4 months ago

sbvor and boatdweller apparently you guys haven't lived anywhere else in a long time... In the real world as well as the corrupt world of steamboat property is never sold at a discount . If the city was so concerned with anything affordable they should have bought land years ago when it was say for arguement sake 1000 per acre instead of today where its say 15,000 per acre. But then again don't count out the ranchers (they're not stupid either) they wait till the price is right before they decide to sell.... Ther're all in cohoots.... IT's been happening back east for years.its just that the Indians weren't smart enough to hold out for more than 24 dollars for Manhattan.

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oofcboy 6 years, 4 months ago

not everyone needs to live in town, if space is a problem .even if you dont like it,you got to go up.more than just 2 stories,you want cheaper living move in the cranes open the home depot, walmart,yes big box companys,every new season you have new people.big city ideas well have to come too. look at vail 3 cranes up right now

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