Luke Graham: Say no to the Tigers

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I root for cities not teams.

That's why when the Detroit Tigers made the World Series, I instantly started rooting for the National League.

Plain and simple, the city of Detroit doesn't deserve another championship.

Before the screaming starts, let me explain.

A championship can mean more to a city than any amount of dollar signs.

As a Buffalo Sabres fan, I had my plane ticket booked for the Stanley Cup celebration last year before they bowed out in the Conference Finals to the eventual-champion Carolina Hurricanes. During the Sabres' miracle run in the NHL playoffs, every time I talked to relatives back in Buffalo the first thing that came up was how the Sabres were saving the city. Buffalo has a foundering economy and zero championships.

It's known the soul of any team is its fans. In Detroit, the fans have been able to celebrate five championships since 1984.

The Tigers won in 1984 and the Red Wings have won 10 Stanley Cup titles. The Pistons won back-to-back titles in 1989 and 1990 and won in 2004.

It's time for another city to take center stage.

Take Cleveland, for example.

The 'Mistake on the Lake,' has endured more than any sports fan should. The Indians and Browns haven't won since Lyndon B. Johnson filled in for John F. Kennedy. The Cleveland Cavaliers have never won. The team has even seen the Browns taken away when Art Modell, about as loved as a bad case of hemorrhoids in Cleveland, moved the team to Baltimore. After a couple of years of no football and heavy drinking, the 'Dawg Pound' finally got its team back.

Cleveland needs something to build on. A championship in Cleveland would give people something to be happy about.

I enjoyed seeing Detroit beat an emotionless Yankees team, but come on, it's about time some other city can pop the cork, turn over some cars and celebrate.

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