News for Saturday, January 28, 2006

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Stories

Drug cases going down

Problems with drugs increase

A decrease in the number of drug-related crimes investigated by the Routt County Sheriff's Office during the past four years does not indicate a decline in drug activity. Rather, local law enforcement officials say drugs continue to be an increasing problem in the area.

John F. Russell: The waiting game

Isn't it sad that the Winter Olympics come around only once every four years?

NCAA elite take hill

Iverson places 12th on Saturday at Howelsen

After finishing 12th -- and being the second American to cross the finish line, Mark Iverson put Saturday's NCAA cross-country ski race at Howelsen Hill in perspective.

The Record for Jan. 29

8:34 a.m. A 35-year-old Steamboat Springs man was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol, careless driving and weaving. The intoxicated man reportedly hit a car near 13th Street and Lincoln Avenue earlier in the morning and left the scene of the accident. About five minutes later, the man reportedly hit another car near Fifth and Yampa streets, which is when officers found the man and arrested him.

One string at a time

South Routt teacher adds violin to music lessons

Listening outside the door of Gerry Sutton's classroom, it would be easy to think he was teaching an alphabet lesson inside. "A...A...A...A," Sutton's voice rings out, speaking to more than 30 students who stayed after school Monday at South Routt Elementary School in Yampa. "B...B...B...B."

Westland Mobile Home Park could be demolished

Ellen Brandt cherishes her neighborhood. It's the kind of place where children play together and neighbors help one another without asking for anything in return. When it snows, Brandt shovels around the vacant home next door. Her 2-year-old daughter, Káli (pronounced KAY-lee), has even learned to say "hello" in Spanish to the neighbor down the street.

Residents hook up to high speed

ZIRKEL Wireless zooms past other Internet service providers

Five years ago, Alan Belvo and his friend Sean Haskett got sick of waiting for their slow dial-up Internet connection and began researching what they could do about it. To remedy their frustrations with their outdated Internet connection, they started their own company.

Main Street looks ahead

Goals go beyond health of downtown businesses

Buoyed by the news this week that they had achieved official status, members of Main Street Steamboat Springs set out an ambitious work plan for 2006.

Bye 'Boat, hello Hayden

Providing for a wife and a 5-year-old daughter in Steamboat Springs is not easy when you make $30,000 a year.

Thinking globally

MWH continues long tradition of Pakistani projects

Alan Krause traveled a great distance from his home in Steamboat Springs this month to give away $50,000.

Lois and Craig Kocian: Keep city's system

I was incredulous to read (ViewPoints, Jan. 22) Stuart Beall's call for a change in the form of Steamboat's government from the present "council-manager" to "strong mayor."

Steamboat girls fall to Palisade

No disrespect to the Steamboat Springs girls basketball team, but Palisade senior Christie Hunter said the Bulldogs did not show up to play Saturday night.

Clearing roofs important

If your garage door won't open or cracks are appearing in your home's drywall, Tom Williams recommends getting that heavy snow off your roof.

Business briefs for Jan. 29

Dial411, a directory assistance company with executive offices in Steamboat Springs, recently landed a major contract with the U.S. Coast Guard.

Reality TV not reality

As the Teen Style staff tried to imagine their perfect day for this month's issue, we thought about the people who go on television to achieve a fantasy reality of their own -- true love, instant fame, untold wealth.

Our View: Main Street deserves support

Main Street Steamboat Springs deserves congratulations for winning official status as a member of the statewide organization.

Arrest Record for Jan. 29

Saturday, Jan. 21 Leon Guy Crawford, 41, Pearl River, La. -- DUI, failure to display lamps (Steamboat Springs Police Department)

Joseph Martino: 1963-2006

Steamboat Springs resident Joseph Paul Martino died Jan. 10, 2006, at the Doak Walker Care Center after fighting cancer for a year. He was 42. Joe grew up in Colorado Springs and attended Air Academy High School, followed by college at Colorado State University, from which he earned a bachelor's degree in engineering in 1985.

'Dogs upset Sailor boys

Steamboat Springs boys basketball coach Kelly Meek saw the overconfidence in his players' eyes before Saturday's game started.

Joseph Martino, 1963-2006

Steamboat Springs resident Joseph Paul Martino died Jan. 10, 2006, at the Doak Walker Care Center after fighting cancer for a year. He was 42.

Kammerer-Judkins

Sherry and Greg Kammerer of Steamboat Springs announce the engagement of their daughter, Sarah Elizabeth Kammerer to Timothy Robert Judkins, son of Meri-Lyn Wright-Judkins, of Allenspark, and Col. James Judkins of Palmdale, Calif.

Harry Trickey: Editorial well done

Although I am not a member of the Steamboat Springs community, I have two grandchildren in the Steamboat Springs school system. On those grounds, I would like to commend you for your well-researched and thoughtful opposition to the proposed Bible studies course (ViewPoints, Jan. 22). Religious education and indoctrination in a specific denomination's doctrine belongs in the home and in the church -- not, as you point out, in a public school.

Diana Eubank: Signs needed

About the editorial (View-Points, Jan. 25) supporting putting up signs for a snowmobile crossing around the area of Dumont Lake: Absolutely! If California can have signs on its freeways warning that illegals may be running across at any time, why can't Colorado put up signs to warn drivers that snowmobilers or any other recreational users may be crossing?

Chris Hart: Stop the legislating

To the editor: I just noticed this week the new "No smoking" signs on the lift poles that have been placed on the mountain.

Lyman Orton: Eliminate the gates

Gated communities have proliferated across suburban America and are now encroaching on rural Northwest Colorado. Developers use gates -- and frequently, a manned guardhouse -- as a marketing tool to sell real estate, citing security as the primary reason and claiming their customers demand them.

Soundoff for Jan. 29

No to Bible course The Bible course is an attempt to bring religion into the classroom. Religion has been the root course of more wars than anything else in this world. We do not need this intrusion into our academic studies in Steamboat. Let's concentrate on the three R's. As a homeowner, I would object to the use of my taxes for this suggested change in our schools courses. -- Chuck Abbott