Selby helped many youths

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The first thing Tim and Kristin Selby saw when they moved to Steamboat was a rainbow. It appeared just as the two were getting out of their rented moving van.

Almost 11 years later, as the Selby family prepares to leave Steamboat, another rainbow has appeared. This time, it is part of the slogan of Christian World Services, the global nonprofit organization where Tim will take a new role as the Rocky Mountain regional director.

A good omen, Kristin Selby said.

"We are following different rainbows," she said. "Life is an adventure. We need to follow his passion of helping with world hunger, disaster relief and refuges."

This weekend was a time of goodbyes for the Selbys. Tim Selby gave his final sermons at the United Methodist Church, where he has been the pastoral associate for the past 10 years. Tim Selby also was honored at a party at Howelsen Ice Arena and a farewell Sunday brunch.

Tim Selby has impacted countless teenagers in his 10 years, youth group leader Linda Nolte said. He has seen them through the angst of the middle school years, boyfriend and girlfriend drama, death, financial hardships and illnesses, she said.

"He's opened our eyes and helped us just be a little brighter and gentler in the world," Nolte said.

When Tim started youth group night, held every Wednesday, more than 80 kids showed up, Cindy Carlson said. The number has dropped through the years as other churches began offering their own youth nights, but the impact Tim Selby continues to have on teenagers was evident during Sunday afternoon's skating session.

Two 13-year-olds, Amanda Luchini and Alyssa Walter, were eager to talk about the influence the man had on their teenage lives.

Walter called him a second dad, and Luchini said he taught her that "it was fine to be yourself no matter what other people think."

The two are among the teenagers who come to the Wednesday night meetings where dinner is served, games are played and time is given for serious discussions.

Carlson said Tim Selby has been instrumental in the lives of her two children, Brandy, 19, and Josh, 13.

"He has been a foundation for the kids' faith," Carlson said. "So many times they don't want to listen to what mom says."

Tim also was active in mission trips. Nolte recalls a recent youth trip to Mexico, where a group of teenagers learned the importance of giving. Carlson remembers a trip they took to a Native American reservation in South Dakota, where she saw him pour "blood, sweat and tears".

Tim, Kristin and their two children, Jessie, 8, and Brendan, 6, are leaving Steamboat for Denver by the end of the month. Tim will be based in Denver with his region covering five states: Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming and Montana.

"We're not moving to China, just down the road," he said. "We are looking forward to continuing the relationships that we built here."

Founded in 1946, Church World Service is the relief, development and refugee assistance ministry of 36 Protestant, Orthodox and Anglican denominations in the United States. This fall, Selby helped organize a Crop Walk in Steamboat, one of the programs the organization supports.

Tim said the decision to take the job was not hard, but the process of leaving Steamboat has been difficult.

"We are making decisions based on how we can best contribute to the world we live in," Selby said. "Sometimes that involves making sacrifices of the things you love."

-- To reach Christine Metz call 871-4229

or e-mail cmetz@steamboatpilot.com

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