THE WAY IT WAS

Hayden hospital opens

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Editor's note: Longtime Pilot & Today columnist Jean Wren, who compiled The Way it Was, has died. Her contributions will be sorely missed. The Pilot & Today will be reprinting a selection of Jean's previous columns.

March 14, 1923

The hospital erected by the citizens of Hayden as a memorial to the late Dr. J.V. Solandt, a pioneer physician of that town, has been entirely completed and is now in operation, having received its first patient last week. Mrs. Earl Pate, a trained nurse, from Great Divide, is superintendent, and Mrs. Anna Bowman, for many years a successful hotel proprietor at Hayden, is housekeeper. The new institution is thoroughly modern and a number of rooms have been furnished by various individuals and fraternal organizations.

A busy youthful forger

The author hip of a number of checks sent to eastern mail order houses from the Blue Mountain section of Moffat County, all of which proved to be forgeries, have been traced to an 11-year-old boy, who thus accumulated a supply of skis, an air gun and other articles dear to boyish hearts. All the checks bore the name of R.E. Morris, a ranchman of that neighborhood. The case will not be prosecuted, as the lad's father, a respected citizen, has made settlement with the victims.

Lost in a blizzard

Moffat County experienced a fierce blizzard for a few hours last Friday night, during which Werner Hering, a ranchman residing northwest of Craig, narrowly escaped losing his life. He was returning home when his team lost its bearings in the drifting snow and he started to walk. He wandered all night, and daylight found him near fortification rocks, nearly exhausted. He managed to return to his team and reached home about noon. For several days he was in serious condition but now is recovering.

A merry surprise

A merry surprise party was given Saturday night at the L.M. Yock ranch, south of Fish Creek, in honor of their neighbor, Mrs. J.H. Williams, and their daughter, Mrs Arthur Schupp of Cow Creek, it being the birthday of both ladies. About 40 guests were present, including a number from town. All are enthusiastic over the delightful time enjoyed. Two big birthday cakes with blazing candles were features of the bounteous feast. Dancing continued until a late hour.

Woodchuck is out of luck

March weather, with more or less snow each day, prevailed from last Friday until yesterday. A week ago the snow was 37 inches deep. New snow brought it to 49 inches. After settling and a thaw, it now measures 42 inches at the gauge. Temperatures have ranged from 32 degrees down to 16 below zero.

By the almanac, next Wednesday is the first day of spring. From more than 40 years of observations, County Clerk John D. Crawford has learned to expect the appearance of the famous woodchuck on the hill which bears its name not earlier than March 12 nor later than March 20 about St. Patrick's Day. We see no reason to expect him tomorrow.

Our friends, our neighbors

Milton Fick, who for some months has been helping his brother, Louis Fick, at the blacksmiths' shop, has been joined by his family. They are occupying the Wilbur Rule house on Pine Street.

Ivan Shorthose and family left yesterday for Denver to remain for the present. Miss Emma Gear, sister of Mrs. Shorthose, accompanied them.

Mrs. Hoyt Shaw, who came up Sunday from McGregor, is quite ill at the home of her sister-in-law, Mrs. F.C. McClelland.

Heavy snows and high winds on "The Hill" have interfered much with this week's Moffat traffic. Wednesday's train was 15.5 hours late and today's train from Denver was annulled because of a collapsed snow shed.

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