City, county join on housing

Authority is among top priorities

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— The City Council and County Commissioners are willing to financially support a multi-jurisdictional housing authority.
Councilman Paul Strong said it might mean cutting back on other services but he was willing to dedicate city funds to the proposed authority over the next three years.
"It is going to be difficult," Strong said. "But year in and year out, it has been (among our) top priorities."
Councilman Bud Romberg and County Commissioner Nancy Stahoviak had been meeting to discuss forming a multi-jurisdictional housing authority between the city and the county. At Monday's joint meeting, Stahoviak and Romberg asked the county and the council if they were willing to fund a housing authority for three years.
"If we are going to go any further than where we are today, there needs to be a commitment of 'yes we want to do this and there will be funding,'" Romberg said.
The proposal would have the city and county funding the authority for three years or more, depending on if voters pass a proposed tax initiative.
Stahoviak said additional funding could come from an Energy Impact Assistance Grant where the city and county would have to match the funds.
In the first year, the city and county would pay $35,000 each.
The second year would have them paying $47,5000 each, and the third, and hopefully final year, would have them paying $60,000 each.
The city and county funding added with the Energy Impact Grant equals the Regional Affordable Living Foundations' administrative budget.
RALF, which would become obsolete if a housing authority were formed, spends $170,000 a year on an executive director, part-time staff and other administrative costs.
Currently, the city gives $32,500 to RALF and the county gives $35,000.
If RALF was dissolved and a housing authority formed, $25,000 would be lost in a grant from the Colorado Division of Housing.
Stahoviak said the city and county need to decide what the housing authority will do and what the director's responsibilities are.
The two boards agreed to talk about a housing authority at its next joint meeting in January. And they recommended asking RALF to join the discussion.
The boards also decided the housing authority would have the power to condemn property, but have to follow a stringent process in doing so.
"Condemnation should not be taken lightly, whether it is for an easement or a piece of property," Strong said.
The question came from the housing working group involved in the Steamboat Springs Area Community Planning Update.
The group expressed major concerns with the authority's power to condemn property, especial property with conservation easements.
RALF Executive Director Rob Dick said the ability to condemn property would be beneficial in getting utility easements.
RALF's Ellen Hoj said affordable housing projects proposed on land with conservation easements would not likely get financial backing.


To reach Christine Metz call 871-4229
or e-mail cmetz@steamboatpilot.com

Councilman Paul Strong said it might mean cutting back on other services but he was willing to dedicate city funds to the proposed authority over the next three years.

"It is going to be difficult," Strong said. "But year in and year out, it has been (among our) top priorities."

Councilman Bud Romberg and County Commissioner Nancy Stahoviak had been meeting to discuss forming a multi-jurisdictional housing authority between the city and the county. At Monday's joint meeting, Stahoviak and Romberg asked the county and the council if they were willing to fund a housing authority for three years.

"If we are going to go any further than where we are today, there needs to be a commitment of 'yes we want to do this and there will be funding,'" Romberg said.

The proposal would have the city and county funding the authority for three years or more, depending on if voters pass a proposed tax initiative.

Stahoviak said additional funding could come from an Energy Impact Assistance Grant where the city and county would have to match the funds.

In the first year, the city and county would pay $35,000 each.

The second year would have them paying $47,5000 each, and the third, and hopefully final year, would have them paying $60,000 each.

The city and county funding added with the Energy Impact Grant equals the Regional Affordable Living Foundations' administrative budget.

RALF, which would become obsolete if a housing authority were formed, spends $170,000 a year on an executive director, part-time staff and other administrative costs.

Currently, the city gives $32,500 to RALF and the county gives $35,000.

If RALF was dissolved and a housing authority formed, $25,000 would be lost in a grant from the Colorado Division of Housing.

Stahoviak said the city and county need to decide what the housing authority will do and what the director's responsibilities are.

The two boards agreed to talk about a housing authority at its next joint meeting in January. And they recommended asking RALF to join the discussion.

The boards also decided the housing authority would have the power to condemn property, but have to follow a stringent process in doing so.

"Condemnation should not be taken lightly, whether it is for an easement or a piece of property," Strong said.

The question came from the housing working group involved in the Steamboat Springs Area Community Planning Update.

The group expressed major concerns with the authority's power to condemn property, especial property with conservation easements.

RALF Executive Director Rob Dick said the ability to condemn property would be beneficial in getting utility easements.

RALF's Ellen Hoj said affordable housing projects proposed on land with conservation easements would not likely get financial backing.

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