Steamboat shop supplies ski boots geared toward comfort | SteamboatToday.com

Steamboat shop supplies ski boots geared toward comfort

Steamboat Ski & Bike Kare’s Bill Kipper fits a Fischer Vacuum boot to the foot of Diane Godfrey on Friday in Steamboat Springs. The boot’s hard plastic shell is made so it can mold to a skier’s foot.

Picking your boot

John Kole, of One Stop Ski Shop in downtown Steamboat Springs, went to school to learn how to properly fit ski boots and has all the certifications to prove it.

“Custom boot fitting is equal parts art, science and love,” he said. “We just love your feet.”

He had a few tips for those looking for a proper fit.

■ Starting at the bottom: “The boot is the most important piece of equipment, and the foundation is the most important part of a good fit,” he said. He highly recommended a custom footbed, which can be molded to provide a tight fit with the base of the foot and allow for greater control and comfort. They run $175, or $99 with a boot purchased at his shop, and he said it’s worth buying a cheaper boot to afford the insole.

■ Loosen up: Stiffness always has been the name of the game, and a good, super-tight fit still is for elite skiers or racers. For the rest of us, technology has downplayed the importance of super-stiff boots. “I often find that people buy boots above their ability level,” he said. “We don’t need that radical stiff boot the way we used to when we were on straight skis.”

■ Think back: One Stop is knocking 30 percent off in the days after Thanksgiving. That’s nothing compared to the steals often available on last season’s stock, though. Kole said that a few 2010-11 boots remain and that they’re available at a 60 percent discount.





Steamboat Ski & Bike Kare's Bill Kipper fits a Fischer Vacuum boot to the foot of Diane Godfrey on Friday in Steamboat Springs. The boot's hard plastic shell is made so it can mold to a skier's foot.
Joel Reichenberger